This list is a selection of some of the published references cited in Papers of the Algonquian Conference/Actes du congrès des Algonquinistes Vol. 32-46, and illustrates the revised bibliographical style that was introduced with Volume 47. It was last updated 25 August 2016. In spite of the imperfections which undoubtedly persist, it may be useful to some contributors, and help to speed along the editorial and production process. Please feel free to cut and paste wherever you find it helpful.

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O’Brien, Jean M. 2010. Firsting and lasting: Writing Indians out of existence in New England. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

O’Brien, Jean. 1997. ‘Divorced’ from the land: Resistance and survival of Indian women in eighteenth-century New England. After King Philip’s War: Presence and Persistence in Indian New England, ed. by Colin Calloway, pp. 144-161. Hanover: University Press of New England.

O’Connell, Barry (ed.). 1992. On our own ground: The complete writings of William Apess, a Pequot. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

O’Meara, Frederick A. 1853. Shahguhnahshe ahnuhmeähwine muzzeneëgun, Ojibwag anwawaud azheühnekenootahbeëgahdag. Toronto: Henry Rowsell.

O’Meara, Frederick A. 1854. Ewh oowahweendahmahgawin owh tabanemenung Jesus Christ. Toronto: Henry Rowsell.

O’Meara, John. 1990. Delaware stem morphology. PhD thesis, McGill University.

O’Meara, John. 1992. Intransitive verbs with secondary objects in Munsee Delaware. Papers of the 23rd Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 322-333. Ottawa: Carleton University.

O’Meara, John. 1995. Productivity and levels of derivation in Munsee Delaware word formation. Papers of the 26th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 335-349. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

O’Meara, John. 1996. Delaware-English, English-Delaware Dictionary. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Oberholtzer, Cath, and Nicholas N. Smith. 1995. I’m the last one who does do it: Birch bark biting, an almost lost art. Papers of the 26th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 306-321. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1989. If bears could talk. Actes du 20e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 267-278. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1990. Pipe dreams: Pipe cleaners and dream motifs. Papers of the 21st Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 279-294. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1991. Beaded hoods of the James Bay Cree: Origins and developments. Papers of the 22nd Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 264-278. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1992. One man’s perspective: Sam Waller’s years at Moose Factory. Papers of the 23rd Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 310-321. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1993. Net baby charms: Metaphors of protection and provision. Papers of the 24th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 318-331. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1994. Cree leggings as a form of communication. Actes du 25e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 347-372. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1994. Together we survive. PhD thesis, McMaster University.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1995. The re-invention of tradition and the marketing of cultural values. Anthropologica 37:141–153.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1996. This isn’t ours: Implications of fieldwork on material culture studies. Journal of Museum Ethnography 8:59–74.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1997. A womb with a view: Cree moss bags and cradleboards. Papers of the 28th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 258-273. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1997. Cree moss bags and cradleboards. Papers of the 28th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David Pentland, pp. 258–273. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1998. A thorny identification: Rosebuds as symbols of native identity. Journal of American Studies of Turkey 8:13-27.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1998. All dolled up: The encapsulated past of Cree dolls. Papers of the 29th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 225-242. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 1999. Cree taapiskaakan: Community ties. Papers of the 30th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 206-221. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 2000. Silk ribbonwork: Unravelling the connections. Papers of the 31st Algonquian Conference, ed. by John D. Nichols, pp. 272-289. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 2001. Are diamonds a Cree girl’s best friend? Preliminary musings. Actes du 32e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by John D. Nichols, pp. 343-358. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 2001. L’Art des algonquins. L’Art du Grand Nord, ed. by Jean Malaurie, pp. 357-391. Paris: Citadelles and Mazenod.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 2002. Fleshing out the evidence: from archaic dog burials to historic dog feasts. The woodlands revisited: Proceedings of the 29th annual symposium of the Ontario Archaeological Society, ed. by Susan Jamieson and Cath Oberholtzer. Ontario Archaeology 73:1-107.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 2002. Six degrees of separation: Connecting Dr. John Rae to James Bay Cree objects in the Royal Ontario Museum. Selected papers of the Rupert’s Land Colloquium, 2002, ed. by David G. Malaher, pp. 211-225. Centre for Rupert’s Land Studies, University of Winnipeg.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 2003. The Dorothy Grant collections: Granting an insight into Cree material culture. Papers of the 34th Algonquian Conference, ed. by H.C. Wolfart, pp. 261-285. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 2004. “Just hanging around:” James Bay Cree bags. Papers of the 35th Algonquian Conference, ed. by H.C. Wolfart, pp. 337-361. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Oberholtzer, Cath. 2012. Dream catchers: Legend, lore and artifacts. Richmond Hill, Ontario: Firefly Books.

Ogg, Arden C. 1989. Ojibwa tales of the Foolish Maidens. Actes du 20e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 279-291. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Ogg, Arden C. 1991. Connective particles and temporal cohesion in Plains Cree. MA thesis, University of Manitoba.

Ohmagari, Kayo. 1995. Culturally sustainable development and James Bay Cree women. Papers of the 26th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 322-334. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Okimāsis, Jean. 2004. Cree: Language of the plains. Regina, Saskatchewan: Canadian Plains Research Centre.

Oldmixon, John. 1931 [1708]. The history of Hudson’s Bay: Containing an account of its discovery and settlement, the progress of it, and the present state; of the Indians, trade and every thing else relating to It. Documents relating to the early history of Hudson Bay, ed. by J.B. Tyrrell, pp. 373–410. Toronto: Champlain Society.

Orr, Jeff, and David W. Friesen. 1998. New path, old ways: Exploring the places of influence on the role identity. Canadian Journal of Native Education 22.2:188-200.

Oswalt, Robert L. 1986. The evidential system of Kashaya. Evidentiality: The linguistic coding of epistemology, ed. by Wallace Chafe and Johanna Nichols, pp. 29-45. Norwood, New Jersey: Ablex.

Oudin, Anne-Sophie, and Lynn Drapeau. 1993. Langue et identité ethnique dans une communauté montagnaise bilingue. Revue québécoise de linguistique 22.2: 75–92.

Ouellet, Eric. 2000. Réflexions personnelles sur le Québec politique d’aujourdhui. Cacouma, Québec: La Petite Maison Bleue.

Oxford, Will. 2007. Towards a grammar of Innu-aimun particles. MA thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Oxford, Will. 2008. A grammatical study of Innu-aimun Particles. Winnipeg: Algonquian and Iroquoian Linguistics Memoir 20.

Oxford, Will. 2008. Towards a grammar of Innu-aimun particles. Papers of the 40th Algonquian Conference, ed. by Karl S. Hele and Regna Darnell, pp. 531–556. London, Ontario: University of Western Ontario.

Oxford, Will. 2011. The syntax of Innu-aimun locatives. Proceedings of WSCLA 16: The Workshop on Structure and Constituency in Languages of the Americas, ed. by Alexis Black and Meagan Louie, pp.135–150. University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

Oxford, Will. 2013. Verb morphology on Innu-aimun pronouns: Evidence for the nature of Algonquian wh-questions. Papers of the 41st Algonquian Conference, ed. by Karl S. Hele and J. Randolph Valentine, pp. 208-229. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.

Oxford, Will. 2014. A survey of locative expressions in Innu-aimun. Papers of the 42nd Algonquian Conference, ed. by J. Randolph Valentine and Monica Macaulay, pp. 181-201. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.

Oxford, William R. 2014. Microparameters of agreement: A diachronic perspective of Algonquian verb inflection. PhD thesis, University of Toronto.

Oxford, William. 2013. Multiple instances of agreement in the clausal spine: Evidence from Algonquian. Proceedings of WCCFL 31, ed. by Robert E. Santana-LaBarge, 335-343, Cascadilla Proceedings Project, Somerville, MA.