This list is a selection of some of the published references cited in Papers of the Algonquian Conference/Actes du congrès des Algonquinistes Vol. 32-46, and illustrates the revised bibliographical style that was introduced with Volume 47. It was last updated 25 August 2016. In spite of the imperfections which undoubtedly persist, it may be useful to some contributors, and help to speed along the editorial and production process. Please feel free to cut and paste wherever you find it helpful.

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Bacon, Joséphine, and Sylvie Vincent. 1994. Tshishenniu-Maninuish umishta-aiatshimun. Montreal: Recherches amérindiennes au Québec.

Bagemihl, Bruce. 1991. Syllable structure in Bella Coola. Linguistic Inquiry 22.4:589-646.

Bailey, Alfred Goldsworthy. 1937. The Conflict of European and eastern Algonkian cultures 1504–1700. St. John: New Brunswick Museum.

Baker, Mark. 1985. The mirror principle and morphosyntactic explanation. Linguistic Inquiry 16.3:373-415.

Baker, Mark. 1988. Incorporation: A theory of grammatical function changing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Baker, Mark. 1996. The polysynthesis parameter. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bakker, Peter, and Lynn Drapeau. 1994. Adventures with the Beothuks in 1787: A testimony from Jean Conan’s autobiography. Actes du 25e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 32-45. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bakker, Peter, and Robert A. Papen 1997. Michif: A mixed language based on French and Cree. Contact languages. A wider perspective, ed. by Sarah Thomason, pp. 295-363. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing.

Bakker, Peter. 1988. Basque Pidgin vocabulary in European-Algonquian trade contacts. Papers of the 19th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 7-15. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bakker, Peter. 1990. The genesis of Michif: A first hypothesis. Papers of the 21st Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 12-35. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bakker, Peter. 1991. The Ojibwa element in Michif. Papers of the 22nd Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 11- 20. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bakker, Peter. 1994. Is John Long’s Chippeway (1791) an Ojibwa Pidgin? Actes du 25e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 13-31. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bakker, Peter. 1997. A language of our own: The genesis of Michif, the mixed Cree-French language of the Canadian Métis. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bakker, Peter. 2006. Algonquian verb structure: Plains Cree. LOT Occasional Series 5, ed. by Grazyna J. Rowicka and Eithne B. Carlin, pp. 1–26. Utrecht: LOT Publications.

Baldwin, Daryl, and David J. Costa. 2005. myaamia neehi peewaalia kaloosioni mahsinaakani: A Miami-Peoria dictionary. Miami, Oklahoma: Miami Nation.

Ball, Jessica. 2005. Early childhood care and development programs as hook and hub for inter-sectoral service delivery in First Nations communities. Journal of Aboriginal Health 1.2:36-50.

Ballantyne, Robert Michael. 1886. Hudson Bay; or, everyday life in the wilds of North America: during six years’ residence in the territories of the Hon. Hudson Bay Company. London: Thomas Nelson and Sons.

Baptiste, Maxine Rose. 2001. Okanagan wh-questions. MA thesis, University of British Columbia.

Bar-El, Leora. 1998. Intonational pauses in Plains Cree. Papers of the 29th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 30-42. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Baraby, Anne-Marie, A. Bellefleur-Tetaut, Lousie Canapé, Caroline Gabriel, and Marie-Paule Mark. 2002. Incorporation of body-part medials in the contemporary Innu (Montagnais) language. Papers of the 33rd Algonquian Conference, ed. by H.C. Wolfart, pp. 1-12. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Baraby, Anne-Marie. 1986. Flexions verbales dans le montagnais de Sheshatshiu. Actes du 17e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 1-14. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Baraby, Anne-Marie. 1989. Changement linguistique dans le dialecte montagnais de Natashquan. Actes du 20e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 17-30. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Baraga, Frederic. 1850. A theoretical and practical grammar of the Otchipwe language. Detroit: Jabez Fox.

Barbeau, C. Marius. 1916. Contes populaires canadiens. The Journal of American Folklore 29.111: 1-154.

Barbour, Philip L. 1975. Notes on Anglo-Algonkian contacts 1605-1624. Papers of the 6th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 112-127. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Barbour, Philip L. 1976. Ocanahowan and recently discovered linguistic fragments from Southern Virginia, c. 1650. Papers of the 7th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 2-17. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Barbour, Philip L. 1977. The antecedents of the Virginia massacre of 1622: An aide-memoire. Actes du 8e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 222-229. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Barbour, Philip L. 1978. Indians and Englishmen as themselves: Notes for an inquiry into basic biases. Papers of the 9th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 188-194. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Barbour, Philip L. 1979. Variant English spellings of Virginia and Maryland Indian place-names before 1620. Papers of the 10th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 43-59. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Barbour, Philip L. 1980. The manuscript “Instructions for a Voyage to New England” (1608-1610?). Papers of the 11th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 135-142. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Barbour, Philip L. 1981. The feasibility of establishing key-spellings for Indian place-names in the index to the complete works of Captain John Smith. Papers of the 12th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 21-30. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Barker, Mary. 2001. Low-level military flight training in Quebec-Labrador: the anatomy of a northern development conflict. Aboriginal autonomy and development in Northern Quebec and Labrador, ed. by Colin Scott, pp. 233–254. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Barkhouse, Angela. 1998. Phonological development in Mi’kmaq and the phonological characteristics of child directed vocabulary in Mi’kmaq. MA thesis, Dalhousie University.

Barnhart, John D. 1945. A new letter about the Massacre at Fort Dearborn. Indiana Magazine of History 41.2:187–199.

Barnouw, Victor (ed.). 1977. Wisconsin Chippewa myths and tales and their relation to Chippewa life: Based on folktales collected by Victor Barnouw, Joseph B. Casagrande, Ernestine Friedl, and Robert E. Ritzenthaler. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Barriault, Yvette. 1971. Mythes et rites chez les Indiens montagnais. Québec: Société historique de la Côte Nord.

Bartlett, William S. 1853. The frontier missionary: A memoir of the life of the Rev. Jacob Bailey, AM, missionary at Pownalborough, Maine; Cornwallis and Annapolis, NS with illustrations, notes, and an appendix, with a preface by Right Rev. George Burgess. D.D. Boston: Ide and Dutton.

Barton, Benjamin Smith. 1797. New views of the origin of the tribes and nations of America. Philadelphia: John Bioren.

Basso, Ellen. 1988. The trickster’s scattered self. Anthropological Linguistics 30.3:292–318.

Battiste, Marie (ed.). 2000. Reclaiming indigenous voice and vision. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Battiste, Marie. 1984. Micmac literacy and cognitive assimilation. Indian education in Canada, ed. by Jean Barman, Yvonne Hébert and Don McCaskill, pp. 23–44. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Bédard, Hélène. 1988. Les Montagnais et la réserve de Betsiamites. Quebec: Institut québécois de recherche sur la culture.

Bédard, Rachel, Alan Ford, and Marie Andrée Hammond. 1980. Les rapports morphologiques entre les verbes TI, TA et AI en montagnais. Papers of the 11th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 274-282. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bederman, Gail. 1995. Manliness and civilization: A cultural history of gender and race in the United States, 1880-1917. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Béland, Jean‑Pierre. 1978. Atikamekw morphology and lexicon. PhD thesis, University of California, Berkeley.

Belanger, Yale. 2001. ‘The region teemed with abundance’: Interlake Saulteaux concepts of territory and sovereignty. Actes du 32e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by John D. Nichols, pp. 17-34. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Belue, Ted Franklin. 1996. The long hunt: Death of the buffalo east of the Mississippi. New York: Stackpole.

Benjamin, Bruening. 2001. Syntax at the edge: Cross-clausal phenomenon and the syntax of Passamaquoddy. PhD thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Bennett, Jo Anne, and John W. Berry. 1989. The meaning and value of the syllabic script for Native people. Actes du 20e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 31-42. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bennett, Jo Anne, and John W. Berry. 1990. Notions of competence in people of Northern Ontario. Papers of the 21st Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 36-50. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bennett, Jo Anne, and John W. Berry. 1992. Changing concepts of self in Northern Ontario communities and some implications for the future. Papers of the 23rd Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 12-21. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Berardo, Marcellino. 2002. Animacy and Shawnee verbal inflection. PhD thesis, University of Michigan – Ann Arbor.

Berbaum, Sylvie. 1997. Activité onirique et forme musicale dans la culture ojibwa. Papers of the 28th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 14-22. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Bierhorst, John. 1976. The Red Swan: Myths and tales of the American Indians. London: Macmillan

Bierhorst, John. 1985. The mythology of North America. New York: William Morrow.

Bird, Louis. 2005. Telling our stories: Omushkego legends and histories from Hudson Bay. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Bird, Louis. 2007. The spirit lives in the mind: Omushkego stories, lives and dreams, ed. by Susan Elaine Gray. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Bishop, Charles A. 1970. The emergence of hunting territories among the Northern Ojibwa. Ethnology 9.1:1-15.

Bishop, Charles A. 1972. Demography, ecology and trade among the Northern Ojibwa and Swampy Cree. Western Canadian Journal of Anthropology 3.1:58-71.

Bishop, Charles A. 1974. The Northern Ojibwa and the fur trade: An historical and ecological study. Toronto: Holt, Rinehart and Winston of Canada.

Bishop, Charles A. 1975. Ojibwa, Cree and the Hudson’s Bay Company in Northern Ontario: Culture and conflict in the eighteenth century. Western Canada past and present, ed. by Anthony W. Rasporich, pp. 150-162. Calgary: McClelland and Stewart West.

Bishop, Charles A. 1975. The origin of the speakers of the Severn dialect. Papers of the 6th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 196-208. Ottawa: Carleton University Press.

Bishop, Charles A. 1976. The emergence of the Northern Ojibwa: Social and economic consequences. American Ethnologist 3.1:39-54.

Bishop, Charles A. 1976. The Henley House massacres. The Beaver 307.2:36-41.

Bishop, Charles A. 1981. Territorial groups before 1821: Cree and Ojibwa. Handbook of North American Indians 6: Subarctic, ed. by June Helm, pp. 158-160. Washington: Smithsonian Institution.

Bishop, Charles A. 1982. The Indian inhabitants of Northern Ontario at the time of contact: Socio-territorial considerations. Approaches to Algonquian archaeology: Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Conference, ed. by Margaret G. Hanna and Brian Kooyman, pp. 253-273. Calgary: Archaeology Association of the University of Calgary.

Bishop, Charles A. 1984. The first century: Adaptive changes among the Western James Bay Cree between the early seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The subarctic fur trade: Native social and economic adaptations, ed. by Shepard Krech, pp. 21-53. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Bishop, Charles A. 1986. Territoriality among Northeastern Algonquians. Anthropologica 18.1:37-63.

Bishop, Charles A. 1989. The question of Ojibwa clans. Actes du 20e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 43-61. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bishop, Charles A. 1994. Northern Algonquians, 1550-1760; Northern Algonquians, 1760-1821. Aboriginal Ontario: Historical perspectives on the First Nations, ed. by Edward S. Rogers and Donald B. Smith, pp. 275-288. Toronto: Dundurn Press.

Bishop, Charles A. 1998. The politics of property among Northern Algonquians. Property in economic context, ed. by Robert C. Hunt and Antonio Gilman, pp. 247-267. Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America.

Bishop, Charles A. 2002. Northern Ojibwa emergence: The migration. Papers of the 33rd Algonquian Conference, ed. by H.C. Wolfart, pp. 13-109. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Bishop, Charles A., and Arthur J. Ray. 1976. Ethnohistoric research in the Central Subarctic: Some conceptual and methodological problems. Western Canadian Journal of Anthropology 6.1:116-144.

Bishop, Charles A., and M. Estellie Smith. 1975. Early historic populations in northwestern Ontario: Archaeological and ethnohistorical interpretations. American Antiquity 40.1:54-63.

Bishop, Charles A., and Shepard Krech, III. 1980. Matriorganization: The basis of aboriginal subarctic social organization. Arctic Anthropology 17.1:34-45.

Bitgood, Stephen. 2003. The role of attention in designing effective interpretive labels. Journal of Interpretation Research 5.2:31–45.

Black Rogers, Mary, and Edward S. Rogers. 1980. Adoption of patrilineal surname system by bilateral Northern Ojibwa: Mapping the learning of an alien system. Papers of the 11th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 198-230. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Black Rogers, Mary, and Edward S. Rogers. 1983. The Cranes and their neighbours, 1770-1970: Trouble case data for tracing WE-THEY boundaries of the northern Ojibwa. Actes du 14e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 91-124. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Black Rogers, Mary. 1982. Algonquian gender revisited: Animate nouns and Ojibwa ‘power’ – an impasse? Papers in Linguistics 15.1:59-76.

Black Rogers, Mary. 1990. Fosterage and field data: The Round Lake study 1989. Papers of the 21st Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 51-71. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Black Rogers, Mary. 1993. A tale of two ethnicities: Identity and ethnicity at Lake of Two Mountains, 1721-1850. Papers of the 24th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 1-7. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Black, M. Jean. 1989. Nineteenth-century Algonquin culture change. Actes du 20e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 62-69. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Blackbird, Andrew Jackson. 1887. History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan: A grammar of their language, and personal and family history of the author. Ypsilanti: Ypsilantian Job Printing House.

Blackledge, Todd A. 1998. Signal conflict in spider webs driven by predators and prey. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological sciences 265.1409:1991–96.

Blackmore, William. 1869. The North American Indians: A sketch of some of the hostile tribes, together with a brief account of General Sheridan’s campaign of 1868 against the Sioux, Cheyenne, Arapahoe, Kiowa and Comanche Indians. Journal of the Ethnological Society of London 1.3:287-320.

Blackwood, Beatrice. 1929. Tales of the Chippewa Indians. Folklore 40.4: 315-344.

Blain, Eleanor M. 1987. Speech of the Lower Red River Settlement. Papers of the 18th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 7-16. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Blain, Eleanor M. 1992. A prosodic look at Ojibwa reduplication. Papers of the 23rd Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 22-44. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Blain, Eleanor M. 1995. Emphatic wiya in Plains Cree. Papers of the 26th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 22-34. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Blain, Eleanor M. 1996. A moraic analysis of syllables in Ojibwe. Nikotwâsik iskwâhtêm, pâskihtêpayih! Studies in honour of H.C. Wolfart, ed. by John D. Nichols and Arden C. Ogg, pp. 35-59. Algonquian and Iroquoian Linguistics Memoir 13. Winnipeg.

Blain, Eleanor M. 1997. Wh-constructions in Nêhiyawêwin (Plains Cree). PhD thesis, University of British Columbia.

Blain, Eleanor M. 1998. The role of hierarchies and alignment in direct/inverse. Papers of the 29th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 53-56. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Blain, Eleanor M. 1999. Nêhiyawêwin nominal clauses. Papers of the 30th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 12-27. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Blessing, Fred K., Jr. 1977. The Ojibway Indians observed: Papers of Fred K. Blessing, Jr., On the Ojibway Indians from The Minnesota Archaeologist. St. Paul: The Minnesota Archaeological Society.

Blick, Jeffrey P. 2000. The archaeology and ethnohistory of the dog in Virginia Algonquian culture as seen from Weyanoke Old Town. Papers of the 31st Algonquian Conference, ed. by John D. Nichols, pp. 1-17. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Bliss, Heather, and Karen Jesney. 2005. Resolving hierarchy conflicts: Local obviation in Blackfoot. Calgary Papers in Linguistics 26:92–116.

Bliss, Heather, Elisabeth Ritter, and Martina Wiltschko. 2012. Blackfoot nominalization patterns. Papers of the 44th Algonquian Conference, ed. by Monica Macaulay, Margaret Noodin, and J. Randolph Valentine. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.

Bliss, Heather, Elizabeth Ritter, and Martina Wiltschko. 2010. A comparative analysis of theme marking in Blackfoot and Nishnaabemwin. Papers of the 42nd Algonquian Conference, ed. by J. Randolph Valentine. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.

Bliss, Heather. 2005. Formalizing point-of-view: The role of sentience in Blackfoot’s direct/inverse system. MA thesis, University of Calgary.

Bliss, Heather. 2005. Topic, focus, and point of view in Blackfoot. Proceedings of the 24th West Coast conference on formal linguistics, ed. by John Alderete et al. pp. 61–69. Cascadilla Proceedings Project. Palo Alto: Linguistics Department, Standford University.

Bliss, Heather. 2007. Object agreement in Blackfoot: Sentient and non-sentient controllers. Papers of the 38th Algonquian Conference, ed. by Wolfart, H.C, pp. 11−28. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press.

Bliss, Heather. 2010. Argument structure, applicatives, and animacy in Blackfoot. Proceedings of WSCLA 13, ed. by Heather Bliss and Raphael Girard. Vancouver: UBC Working Papers in Linguistics 26.

Bliss, Heather. 2012. A split DP analysis of Blackfoot nominal expressions. Proceedings of the 2012 Canadian Linguistic Association, ed. by P. Cajax. Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier.

Bliss, Heather. 2013. The Blackfoot configurationality conspiracy: Parallels and differences in clausal and nominal structures. PhD thesis, University of British Columbia.

Bliss, Heather. 2014. Assigning reference in clausal nominalizations. Crosslinguistic investigations of nominalization patterns, ed. by Ileana Paul, pp. 85–118. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Bloomfield, Leonard, and John D. Nichols (eds.). 1991. The dog’s children: Anishinaabe texts told by Angeline Williams. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1920-1949. Leonard Bloomfield Papers. National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Washington.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1925. Notes of the Fox Language [Part 1]. International Journal of American Linguistics 3:219-232.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1925. On the sound system of Central Algonquian. Language 1:130–156.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1927. Notes of the Fox Language [Part 2]. International Journal of American Linguistics 4.2:181-219.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1927. The word-stems of Central Algonquian. Festschrift Meinhof, pp. 393–402. Hamburg: L. Fiedrichsen.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1928. Menomini texts. New York: Publications of the American Ethnological Society 12.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1933. Language. New York: Holt.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1934. Plains Cree Texts. New York: G.E. Stechert and Co.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1946. Algonquian. Linguistic structures of native America, ed. by Cornelius Osgood and Harry Hoijer, pp. 85–129. Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology 6. New York.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1958. Eastern Ojibwa: Grammatical sketch, texts and word list, ed. by Charles F. Hockett. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1962. The Menomini language, ed. by Charles F. Hockett. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1975. Menominee lexicon, ed. by Charles F. Hockett. Milwaukee Public Museum Publications in Anthropology and History 3.

Bloomfield, Leonard. 1984. Cree-English lexicon. New Haven, Connecticut: Human Relations Area Files. 2 vols.

Blum, Ronny. 2005. Ghost brothers: Adoption of a French tribe by a bereaved Native America. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Blythe, Jennifer M., Peggy Martin Brizinski, and Sarah Preston. 1985. “I was never idle:” Women and work in Moosonee and Moose Factory. TASO Report 21. Ontario: McMaster University.

Boas, Franz. 1925. Romance folk-lore among American Indians. Romanic Review 16.3:199–207.

Bock, Philip. 1978. Micmac. Handbook of North American Indians 15: Northeast, ed. by Bruce G. Trigger, pp. 109-122. Washington: Smithsonian Institution.

Boling, Jerry. 1981. Selected problems in Shawnee syntax. PhD thesis, Indiana University.

Bonvillain, Nancy. 1973. A grammar of Akwesasne Mohawk. Ottawa: National Museum of Man Mercury Series, Ethnology Division Paper 8.

Boudreau, François. 2000. Identité, politique et spiritualité : entretiens avec quelques leaders Ojibwas du nord du lac Huron. Recherches Amérindiennes au Québec 30.1:71-85.

Bourque, Bruce. 2004. Twelve thousand years American Indians in Maine. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Bousquet, Marie-Pierre 2008. A question of emotions and a matter of respect: Interpreting conversion to Catholicism among Quebec Algonquins. Papers of the 39th Algonquian Conference, ed. By Karl S. Hele and Regna Darnell, pp. 52-71. Ontario: University of Western Ontario.

Bousquet, Marie-Pierre et Anny Morissette. 2008. Inscrire la mémoire semi-nomade dans l’actualité sédentaire: Les églises de Pikogan et de Manawan (Québec). Archives de sciences sociales des religions 141:9-32.

Bousquet, Marie-Pierre. 2001. “Quand nous vivions dans le bois,” le changement spatial et sa dimension générationnelle: l’exemple des Algonquins du Canada. Thèse de doctorat en cotutelle France-Québec, département d’ethnologie et de sociologie comparative, Université de Paris X-Nanterre, et département d’anthropologie, Université Laval.

Bousquet, Marie-Pierre. 2005. La spiritualité amérindienne sur la place publique: à la recherche d’un statut, chapitre 8 de La religion dans la sphère publique, Solange Lefebvre (éd.), pp. 171-196. Montréal: Les Presses de l’Université de Montréal.

Bousquet, Marie-Pierre. 2007. Catholicisme, pentecôtisme et spiritualité traditionnelle: Les choix religieux contemporains chez les Algonquins du Québec. Les systèmes religieux amérindiens et inuit: perspectives historiques et contemporaines, ed. by Claude Gelinas and Gratien Teasdale, pp. 155-66. Quebec City and Paris: Muséologie In-Situ et L’Harmattan.

Bowern, Claire. 2004. Bardi verb morphology in the historical perspective. PhD thesis, Harvard University.

Boyden, Joseph. 2001. Born with a tooth. Toronto: Cormorant Books Inc.

Boyden, Joseph. 2006. Three day road. Toronto: Viking Canada.

Boyden, Joseph. 2009. Through Black Spruce. Toronto: Viking Canada.

Bragdon, Kathleen J. 1979. Probate records as a source for Algonquian ethnohistory. Papers of the 10th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 136-141. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bragdon, Kathleen J. 1981. Linguistic acculturation in Massachusett: 1663-1771. Papers of the 12th Algonquian Conference, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 121-132. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bragdon, Kathleen J. 1986. Native economy on eighteenth century Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket. Actes du 17e Congrès des Algonquinistes, ed. by William Cowan, pp. 27-42. Ottawa: Carleton University.

Bragdon, Kathleen. 1996. Gender as a social category in Native Southern New England. Ethnohistory 43.4:573-592.

Bragdon, Kathleen. 1996. Native people of Southern New England, 1500-1650. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

Bragdon, Kathleen. 1997. Massachusett kinship terminology and social organization, 1620–1750. Northeast Anthropology 54:1–14.

Bragg, Russell. 1976. Some aspects of the phonology of Newfoundland Micmac. MA thesis, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Brandão, José António, and William A. Starna. 1996. The treaties of 1701: A triumph of Iroquois diplomacy. Ethnohistory 43:209-244.

Branigan, Phil, and Marguerite MacKenzie. 1999. A double-object constraint in Innu-aimun. Papers of the 30th Algonquian Conference, ed. by David H. Pentland, pp. 28-33. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Branigan, Phil, and Marguerite MacKenzie. 1999. Binding relations and the nature of ’pro’ in Innu-Aimun. NELS 29: Proceedings of the North East Linguistic Society, ed. by Nancy Hall, Masako Hirotani, and Pius Tamanji, pp. 475–486. Amherst: Graduate Linguistic Student Association.

Branigan, Phil, and Marguerite MacKenzie. 2001. How much syntax can you fit in a word: The grammar of Innu-aimun verbal agreement. Proceedings of WSCLA 5: The Workshop on Structure and Constituency in Languages of the Americas, ed. by Suzanne Gessner, Sunyoung Oh, and Kayono Shiobara, pp. 37-52. Vancouver: UBC Working Papers in Linguistics 5.

Branigan, Phil, and Marguerite MacKenzie. 2002. Altruism, Ā-movement, and object agreement in Innu-aimûn. Linguistic Inquiry 33.3:385–407.

Branigan, Phil, and Marguerite MacKenzie. 2002. Word order variation at the left periphery in Innu-aimûn. Papers of the 33rd Algonquian Conference, ed. by H.C.Wolfart, pp. 110–119. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Branigan, Phil, Julie Brittain, and Carrie Dyck. 2005. Balancing syntax and prosody in the Algonquian verb complex. Papers of the 36th Algonquian Conference, ed. by H.C. Wolfart, pp. 75–93. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba.

Brasser, Ted J. 1976. “Bo’jou, Neejee!” Profiles of Canadian Indian art. Ottawa: National Museum of Man.

Brasser, Ted J. 1978. Mahican. Handbook of North American Indians 15: Northeast, ed. by Bruce Trigger, pp. 198–212. Washington: Smithsonian Institution.

Brasser, Ted J. 1990. Firebags of the fur trade. Eye of the angel: Selections from the Derby Collection, ed. by David Wooley, pp. 35-39. Northampton, Massachusetts: White Star Press.

Brave Heart-Jordan, Maria Yellow Horse. 1995. The Return to the Sacred Path: Healing from Historical Trauma and Historical Unresolved Grief Among the Lakota. Northampton: Smith College School for Social Work.

Brave Heart, Maria Yellow Horse, Josephine Chase, Jennifer Elkins, and Deborah B. Altschul. 2011. Historical Trauma Among Indigenous Peoples of the Americas: Concepts, Research, and Clinical Considerations. Journal of Psychological Drugs 43.4:282-290.

Bresnan, Joan, and Sam A. Mchombo. 1987. Topic, pronoun, and agreement in Chichewa. Language 63:741-782.

Bright, William. 1957. The Karok language. Berkeley: University of California Publications in Linguistics 13.

Bright, William. 1984. A Karok myth in ‘measured verse’: The translation of a performance. American Indian linguistics and literature, ed. by William Bright, pp. 91-100. The Hague: Mouton.

Brightman, Robert. 1993. Grateful prey: Rock Cree human-animal relationships. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Brightman, Robert. 2007. Ācaðōhkīwina and ācimōwina: Traditional narratives of the Rock Cree indians. Regina: Canadian Plains Research Center.

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